Labor of love

Thankful for Good Books During a Hospital Stay

There is a kind of comradery on the hospital elevator. I recognize the tension on the faces of men and women. We make a little conversation about the weather. Then we smile and wish each other a good day as we exit the elevator.

For almost two weeks I have made the daily trip to sit at the bedside of my brother. My role is simple. I answer questions and advocate for him. My brother doesn’t talk much, so I have had lots of time to read.

The Best of A. W. Tozer, a collection of excerpts from his books, is inspiring. The book was compiled by Warren Wiersbe. The first chapter, Following Hard After God, is from The Pursuit of God. I have been reading a chapter each day.

A dear friend loaned me some books by Sandra Dallas.   I thoroughly   enjoyed Prayers for Sale.   It is a novel about two women—one in her   eighties and the other in her late teens. The story is set in a mining town in Colorado, in the 1930s. The importance of women’s friendship is the underlying theme. Forgiveness and redemption are also a part of the story.

I borrowed Night by Elie Wiesel from my sister.  The book is the true    story of Elie’s survival in a Nazi concentration camp. His father died in the camp a few months before liberation took place. It is a heart wrenching story, but so instructive.

In his book Wiesel documents the warning that was given to his town by a man that had escaped from the death camps. No one believed the man. They couldn’t fathom it. They discarded the plea that he made for them to flee.

I wonder if there are warning signs today that are considered beyond belief. Independent researchers, some doctors and parents are raising the alarm over vaccine injury. The number of vaccines given to a young child has steadily increased with more being planned.

No one wants to believe that vaccines could have a negative impact on health. Yet, the pharmaceuticals have no liability for vaccine injury. The National Vaccine Information Center is a good resource for parents that want to be well informed.

My sister has some books by Dorothy Sayers. I love a good mystery so in the evenings I read Strong Poison. The main character, Lord Peter Wimsey, is quite taken by a young author, Harriet Vane. She is accused of murder, and Lord Peter is determined to prove her innocence.

Do you have a favorite mystery writer? I’d love to read your comment.

Sharing this post with Booknificent Thursday,  Literacy Musing Monday and Christian Blogger Community

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Carol

Carol is a follower of Jesus and a wife, mom & grandma. She worked for many years as a childbirth nurse and prenatal educator. She recently retired from clinical work. She has written articles for nursing journals and devotionals. Her novel, Aliisa’s Letter, was published in 2010 and she is currently working on another project.

6 thoughts on “Thankful for Good Books During a Hospital Stay”

  1. Thank you for linking up at Literacy Musing Mondays! I know my husband likes Father Brown, too. I mostly read fantasy or Christian historical fiction, so I can’t think of any Mysteries off the top of my head.

  2. I appreciate your thoughts, Carol. Glad you reminded me of Dorothy L. Sayers; I haven’t read her in a while. Have you read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (Rachel Joyce) or either of Helen Simonson’s novels? Sorry, I can’t recommend any of the mysteries I’ve read lately, but these three novels are all engaging. Blessings to you and your brother.

  3. Hi! I’m your neighbor at #LMMLinkup. Reading books is a great idea when you’re waiting at a hospital. Looks like you have a good variety.

    I enjoyed the Father Brown mysteries by G. K. Chesterton. You can get them on Kindle and I think there may be a place online you can read them free. There is a book called The Complete Father Brown which includes lots of stories.

    Blessings to you!

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