Mercy in a Children’s Book

Mercy

A terrible accident took place in the hills of Switzerland. A child sustained a debilitating injury and one boy, Lucien, had provoked the accident.  This is how the story begins in Patricia St. John’s book, Treasures of the Snow. This book for children was first published in 1948.

As I continued to read, I was startled by the clear themes of sin, anger, and bitterness—and the way sin makes barriers between people. The story was told with gentleness, but was bringing a clear message to children about the human heart.

The grandmother has nuggets of truth for Annette who struggles with bitterness.

Every day of your life, ugly, angry selfish thoughts will knock at the door and try to get in again. Don’t try to push them back yourself. Ask Jesus to help you by filling you with His love. Read about the love of Jesus every day in your Bible. If you keep your heart full of it, there won’t be room for those bad thoughts to stay. [p. 172]

As the story continues Annette and Lucien both realize their own sin. This is the beginning of mercy, compassion and healing. //

Patricia St. John’s story has lingered in my mind because of the deep truths embedded in the words.

In the book of Hebrews we find this guidance.

Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a high priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who has been tempted in all things as we are, yet without sin.

Let us therefore draw near with confidence to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and may find grace to help in time of need. Hebrews 4:14 – 16

Linking this post with the Five Minute Friday writing community and Heart Encouragement.

Text edited: Correction made to scripture reference. The scripture text is from the book of Hebrews.

Author: Carol

Carol is a follower of Jesus and a wife, mom & grandma. She worked for many years as a childbirth nurse and prenatal educator. She recently retired from clinical work. She has written articles for nursing journals and devotionals. Her novel, Aliisa's Letter, was published in 2010 and she is currently working on another project.

11 thoughts on “Mercy in a Children’s Book”

  1. Wise words–we don’t have to let the thoughts that come knocking in.
    I’ve never heard of that book, but am going to see if it’s in the library. Sounds like a beautiful story.
    Visiting from #26

  2. “Every day of your life, ugly, angry selfish thoughts will knock at the door and try to get in again. Don’t try to push them back yourself. Ask Jesus to help you by filling you with His love. Read about the love of Jesus every day in your Bible. If you keep your heart full of it, there won’t be room for those bad thoughts to stay. [p. 172]”

    I love this! Thank you so much for sharing this beautiful story. It is so easy to hold on to angry, bitter thoughts when someone has wronged us. But when we fill our minds with God’s Word and the love of Jesus there’s no room for those thoughts to come in.

    Love,
    Annie FMF#19

  3. Think my comment got lost.

    Lord, please tell me what I did
    that was so very, very wrong;
    please don’t turn, and keep it hid
    in a vague King David song!
    I now that cancer is a part
    of a fallen word, that’s true,
    but I beg you, have a heart;
    I need to find a hope in You!
    The pain’s beyond what I can bear,
    and morphine doesn’t touch the root,
    I need to hear that You still care,
    and Your word can still impute
    a hope to heal my sinner’s heart;
    please say that we are not apart!

  4. Thank you for sharing. “Treasures of the Snow” is a wonderful book! A favorite with my children, especially my youngest son…. always on the list for re-reading when they were elementary age. I personally love her books for the truths (as you mentioned), the story lines, and her wonderful descriptions. I’ve used descriptive lines / paragraphs from her books in teacher workshops on writing with mentor text. …and I’m enjoying Patricia St. John’s books with my grandkids.

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