Herbs in the Garden: Nourishment and Remedies

Springtime brings warmer weather, more sunshine, blossoms on the trees and the beginning of a parade of flowers. One of my favorite activities is planting seeds and watching them germinate. Only God can package life in a tiny seed!

A couple years ago I planted nettle seeds—a herb that I was familiar with as a tea. To my delight, little nettle plants sprouted and the plants have come back each year. (I keep them in a pot in a secluded location. The leaves and stems have little hairs that sting when touched; I wear gloves harvesting.)

Stinging Nettle

Susun Weed writes in her book, Herbal for the Childbearing Year*:

The common stinging nettle is a uterine tonic and general nourisher with a special ability to strengthen the kidneys and adrenals. Its high mineral and chlorophyll content make it an excellent food and tonic for the hormonal system.

I have enjoyed nettle tea and have added nettle to soups. When the leaves are cooked the sting is gone. In an old Swedish cook book, I found a recipe for nettle soup.

I have planted seeds for calendula flowers outside and they have begun to sprout. Calendula is a favorite herb in my garden.

The book, Essential Herbs: Treat Yourself Naturally with Herbs and Homemade Remedies** has this note about calendula flowers:

Traditionally said to lift the spirits and encourage cheerful ness, calendula is one of the most popular and versatile medicinal herbs in current use. It is widely available in commercial calendula ointments and creams and is also used internally . . .  

Calendula flower

 I have made myself calendula tea. I have used the tea as a mouthwash for gum irritations and it has brought healing. I have also made calendula salve for skin irritations.

This post is shared with the Five Minute Friday Writing Community . Also sharing with the Hearth and Soul link-up and Sue’s image-in-ing and Tuesday with a Twist and Inspire Me Monday .

*Susun Weed, Herbal for the Childbearing Year, Woodstock, New York: Ash Tree Publishing, 1986, p.2

**J. Behrens, S. Curtis, L. Green, P. Ody, D. Vilinac, Essential Herbs, New York : DK Publishing, 2020 p. 60

Herbal Home Health Care

This summer my husband and I were in a bulk food store. He wandered around while I chose whole grain flour, spices and coconut oil. He brought a book to me and said, “I think you would like this.” The title of the book is Be Your Own “Doctor” An informative Guide to Herbal Home Health Care. The back cover explains that the author is an educator and midwife.

Be Your Own Doctor

When I flipped through the book I agreed with my husband. It is a good resource. The book has chapters on a number of herbs including chamomile, comfrey, echinacea, lavender, red raspberry leaf and slippery elm. Rachel Weaver describes the way she has used these herbs and the results she achieved. Throughout the book Weaver gives recipes and instructions on teas, salves and tinctures.

Weaver covers pregnancy, infant care and common ailments with her suggestions for supporting health. Some of the treatments I was already familiar with.

Garlic has been part of our home health for many years. The chapter on garlic provides a good review of information that I have read in other sources. The new feature in this chapter is a Super Duper Tonic, a combination of garlic and herbs that acts like an antibiotic.

Weaver provides a recipe for a gallbladder flush. It is similar to one that I have used over the years for a colicky gall bladder. My doctor recommended that I have gall bladder surgery after my youngest son was born. I was breastfeeding him and didn’t want to have surgery. I decided to try a gallbladder flush first. I was able to avoid surgery.

The book contains common sense, but it is good to keep in mind that every family is unique and may find some information more helpful than others. A paragraph in the foreword explains the benefits and limitations of the book.

Be Your Own Doctor is not intended to give you any medical advice. The FDA prohibits me from doing that. I am not a medical doctor and the things that I am presenting here were not scientifically tested at the cost of thousands of dollars. I am only passing on to you common sense information that is the result of common sense living and has been used by many mothers and grandmothers for hundreds of years to heal their families. The proof that these things work, lies in the successes of people, not in the million-dollar tests of the laboratories. But remember that you are responsible for whatever information you choose to use from this book.

I was happy to see that the book is available from the Bulk Herb Store. Just click the button to visit the this store.

Great selection of bulk herbs, books, and remedies. Articles, Research Aids and much more.

Linking with Titus 2sdays,  Friendship FridayBooknificnent Thursday,  Whole Hearted Home, A Little R & R,  the Homemaking PartyTuesdays with a Twist and the Art of Homemaking