Searching for My Voice, Remembering to Vote

As I walked out of the post office an older gentleman was parking his car. When I got into my car he walked over to my window and tried to say something. His hair was white and he was a little bent over. I was a little surprised and wondered what he needed.

I rolled down my window and he asked,  “How does it feel to live  in  a    foreign country?”

I was flummoxed and finally asked, “What do you mean?”

He pointed to my shirt and said, “I noticed the map on your shirt.”

I was wearing a t-shirt with this slogan:

Michigan girl

“Oh, I see.” I smiled. “I think I have more of a voice in Michigan.”

He chuckled. I wondered if he recognized my frustration with Illinois politics.

We wished each other a good day.

My mind is on politics. My perspectives are quite different from the two Senators that represent me in Washington D.C. Earlier in the day I had tried expressing my thoughts to them in an e-mail,  hoping  that  Neil    Gorsuch would be confirmed for the Supreme Court. I wondered if the effort was worth it.

Perhaps I have a better chance to make my voice  heard  on  the  local   level. We are having an election for the school board and village trustees. I looked into the issues and candidates. I will vote.

Sometimes I am frustrated as I think about the problems in our country and the future for my grandchildren. We have complex social and health issues. What should we do? What is my role as a follower of Jesus?

In a way, the world is a foreign country. The Lord has chosen to place us here so that we can have an impact. He has given us the Word and asks our obedience.

Jesus prayed for his followers: I do not ask that you take them out of the world, but that you keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. Sanctify them in the truth; your word is truth. As you sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world. And for their sake I consecrate myself, that they also may be sanctified in truth. I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. John 17: 15-21

This prayer is a comfort to me and I hope it gives comfort to you too. When we spend time in God’s word we will receive the guidance we need.

We are invited to pray. Jesus taught us to approach God in prayer as our Father in heaven.

As citizens of this country we have the opportunity to vote. It is a way to use our voice.

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Scenes from the Keweenaw Peninsula

We just returned from a trip to the Keweenaw peninsula of northern Michigan. Calumet (the town where my father grew up) is now a part of the Keweenaw National Historic Park.

Copper World is on the main street of Calumet. The shop still sells my novel.

Copper World

The Rosetta Cafe is a favorite stop for great soup at lunch time–and good coffee all the time.

Cafe Rosetta

Lake Superior is not far from Calumet.

U.P. 7:2015_4728

Sharing this post with Seasons and Sue’s Wordless Wednesday

Autumn Praise

My husband and I spent a few days in Upper Michigan. We were working on projects at an old farmhouse—a place I have visited almost every year, as far back as I can remember. We also enjoyed the peak fall color while driving and hiking.

Near Baraga

The trees in Upper Michigan are in splendid color. It is like a song of praise to the creator.

Forest Path

Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth;
Break forth into joyous song and sing praises.
Psalm 98:4

The Lord God is magnificent. He holds every detail of our world in his hand. He is sovereign over all things. I look forward to the completion of his plans for us.

Autumn Forest

Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy before the Lord, for he comes,
for he comes to judge the earth.
He will judge the world in righteousness, and the peoples in his faithfulness.
Psalm 96: 12b-13

Maple Leaves

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Pasties with Kale: A Meal

The pasty came to the Keweenaw Peninsula of northern Michigan with Cornish miners. The Finns caught on to the hearty meal that was portable. Meat and vegetables wrapped in pastry made a filling lunch during the long hours in the mine.

My grandfathers were miners, and pasties were served for family   dinners. It is a meal that invites group participation for preparation. This year I have had a steady supply of kale and thyme in my garden—and I added them to my pasties.

Kale & Thyme

Filling:

1 lb. round steak, diced or coarsely ground
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
1 clove of garlic finely minced
1 cup chopped and steamed kale leaves
1 cup rutabaga, chopped
½ cup finely chopped onion
4 large potatoes, peeled and diced
1 + ½ tsp. salt

Combine olive oil, vinegar, thyme and minced garlic. Mix into the chopped meat. Allow the meat marinate in the refrigerator while preparing the pastry and the vegetables.

Pastry:

3 cups flour
½ tsp. salt
2/3 cup shortening
1 egg yolk
½ cup + 2 Tblsp. cold water
1 Tblsp. cider vinegar

Combine flour and salt. Cut in the shortening until it appears as coarse crumbs. Mix the egg yolk, water and vinegar. Gradually add this to the flour mixture, stirring with a fork. Mix just until it holds together. If needed added additional water a tablespoon at a time. Divide the dough into six portions and roll out each portion to a 9” circle. Set aside.

Cut the kale into pieces and steam it for about 3 minutes.

Kale
steamed kale

Chop the rutabaga and potatoes into about 1” pieces. Chop the onion finely. Add the vegetables and salt to the meat mixture. Mix well.

Place a generous cup of filling on half of each dough circle. Fold the other half of dough over the filling and crimp the edges. Place the pasties on a lightly greased cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 50 minutes or until lightly browned. Serve hot.

Pasty

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Rock and Salvation

Lake Superior
By Lake Superior

For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence,

for my hope is from him.

He only is my rock and my salvation,

my fortress; I shall not be shaken.

On God rests my salvation and my glory;

my mighty rock, my refuge is God.

Psalm 62: 5-7

Linking with Wordless Wednesday,  Good Morning Mondays,  Sunday Stillness and Weekend Whispers

Potato Salad with Apple

L of L

The apples are ripening. So many good recipes include apples, but have you ever added apples to potato salad? A Finnish chef shared a recipe for potato salad with an apple at a conference I attended. Here is my version of the recipe:

6 medium size yukon gold potatoes

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon vinegar

1/3 cup mayonnaise

1 apple (I like pink lady for this recipe)

1 large dill pickle

2 Tablespoons of chopped chives

1 garlic clove, peeled and diced (optional)

1/3 cup whole milk yogurt

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

Steam the potatoes until tender. Immediately peel them—the skin will slip off with a little effort. (I use a fork to stabilize the potato and a knife to gently remove the skin.) Chop the hot potatoes coarsely. Mix the olive oil and vinegar and add it to the potatoes. Mix. Then add the mayonnaise. Mix. A southern chef taught me this process of working with the potatoes while they are still hot to preserve the creamy quality of the potatoes.

Then refrigerate the potatoes while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. Peel and chop the apple, dice the dill pickle and garlic clove. Add the apple, pickle, garlic and chives to the potatoes and mix.

Make sure the potatoes have cooled down before adding the yogurt. When it is cool add the yogurt, salt and pepper.

If you make the salad a day ahead the flavors have a chance to meld together.

Potato Salad with Apple

Potatoes have these nutrients: Vitamin C, Vitamin B-1, Niacin, Potassium and Iron.

The Michigan Potato Industry Commission has these tips for storing potatoes:

  • Handle gently. Bumps and bruises can lead to rot.
  • Store at a temperature between 40 to 50 degrees. Storing in the refrigerator may be too cool, causing the potato starch to turn to sugar. (I don’t really have room in my refrigerator for a bag of potatoes.)
  • Store in a dark, dry place. It is a little challenging to store potatoes in the summer! How do you store your potatoes?

Linking with The Art of Home-Making,  Motivation MondayFriendship Friday,  From the Farm and Real Food Friday

Rocks and Waves

Recently I saw a tee shirt online with this message: Just a Michigan girl in an Illinois world. I feel that way. Michigan is home to me even though I have lived in Illinois for many years.

We were in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan a week ago. We had projects that we were working on, but we found some time to spend along the coast of Lake Superior.

Of the great lakes, Lake Superior is the majestic one—in my opinion. The coastline is rugged.

Superior Coast

Many colorful rocks show up on the beaches, thrown up from the deep by the waves. Some days the waves are light, but on other days the waves thunder as they crash on the beach.

Superior Shore:rocks

Since childhood I have enjoyed looking at the rocks. I still remember showing a rock to my uncle. He exclaimed, “That’s an agate. You found an agate.”

Agates come in a variety of forms and colors. Bands of color mark these stones. At one point in time minerals entered pockets in porous rocks and became fused there. When the rocks are wet it is easiest to see the bands of color.

Lake Superior Agate
Lake Superior Agate

I can spend a couple hours walking along the shore of Lake Superior, with the sound of waves making a powerful but soothing rhythm. In the process of looking for agates I lose myself, absorbed with beauty that God has created in nature.

A quote from Henry David Thoreau resonates with me: Nature doth thus kindly heal every wound. By the mediation of a thousand little mosses and fungi, the most unsightly objects become radiant of beauty. There seem to be two sides of this world, presented us at different times, as we see things in growth or dissolution, in life or death. And seen with the eye of the poet, as God sees them, all things are alive and beautiful.
Source: Journal entry, March 13, 1842

I forget the latest news. I am away from television, my computer and the phone. I am away from the voices in our culture. I am thankful for this time to be restored. I am thankful for our Creator.

Mightier than the thunder of many waters, mightier than the waves of the sea, the Lord on high is mighty!
Psalm 93: 4

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