Herbal Home Health Care

This summer my husband and I were in a bulk food store. He wandered around while I chose whole grain flour, spices and coconut oil. He brought a book to me and said, “I think you would like this.” The title of the book is Be Your Own “Doctor” An informative Guide to Herbal Home Health Care. The back cover explains that the author is an educator and midwife.

Be Your Own Doctor

When I flipped through the book I agreed with my husband. It is a good resource. The book has chapters on a number of herbs including chamomile, comfrey, echinacea, lavender, red raspberry leaf and slippery elm. Rachel Weaver describes the way she has used these herbs and the results she achieved. Throughout the book Weaver gives recipes and instructions on teas, salves and tinctures.

Weaver covers pregnancy, infant care and common ailments with her suggestions for supporting health. Some of the treatments I was already familiar with.

Garlic has been part of our home health for many years. The chapter on garlic provides a good review of information that I have read in other sources. The new feature in this chapter is a Super Duper Tonic, a combination of garlic and herbs that acts like an antibiotic.

Weaver provides a recipe for a gallbladder flush. It is similar to one that I have used over the years for a colicky gall bladder. My doctor recommended that I have gall bladder surgery after my youngest son was born. I was breastfeeding him and didn’t want to have surgery. I decided to try a gallbladder flush first. I was able to avoid surgery.

The book contains common sense, but it is good to keep in mind that every family is unique and may find some information more helpful than others. A paragraph in the foreword explains the benefits and limitations of the book.

Be Your Own Doctor is not intended to give you any medical advice. The FDA prohibits me from doing that. I am not a medical doctor and the things that I am presenting here were not scientifically tested at the cost of thousands of dollars. I am only passing on to you common sense information that is the result of common sense living and has been used by many mothers and grandmothers for hundreds of years to heal their families. The proof that these things work, lies in the successes of people, not in the million-dollar tests of the laboratories. But remember that you are responsible for whatever information you choose to use from this book.

I was happy to see that the book is available from the Bulk Herb Store. Just click the button to visit the this store.

Great selection of bulk herbs, books, and remedies. Articles, Research Aids and much more.

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Honor or Riches

Honor or Riches

Last week I quoted half of this verse in Proverbs because I wasn’t quite sure what to make of the second line. I was glad to have the opportunity to attend a class on Hebrew poetry. The class gave me new insight.

Our teacher, Tim Sigler, gave an overview of Hebrew poetry. One of the features is parallelism. One verse contains two lines; when they are placed alongside each other, they expand the meaning. Each verse can have a nugget of wisdom that applies to many situations. This is especially true of Proverbs.

The parallelism can be affirming, opposing or advancing. The verse that had been playing in mind all week is an example of opposing parallelism.

A gracious woman gets honor,
And violent men get riches. Proverbs 11:16

Gracious is in contrast to violent. Honor is in contrast to riches. I have been thinking about the controversies in our culture.

The abortion industry. The vaccine industry. A connection exists between abortion and vaccine development. Click here. I grasp at ways to pray about these issues.

In real life a medical researcher that refused to be paid in return for omitting data from a research study demonstrates the characteristic of honor. Is bribery and deceit a form of violence? Consider a quote from an interview with this doctor. The interview appeared in Der Spiegel, a German magazine (September 5, 2015).

SPIEGEL: In your early years as a researcher, a pharmaceutical company offered you a bribe equivalent to two years of your salary: They wanted to prevent you from publishing negative study results. Were you disappointed that you weren’t worth more?

Peter Wilmshurst: (laughs) I was just a bit surprised to be offered any money, really. I was a very junior researcher and doctor, only 33 years old, so I didn’t know that sort of thing happened. I didn’t know that you could be offered money to conceal data.   Click here to read more.

A whistleblower, who was part of a research team for the CDC, has claimed that some data, significant to the safety of vaccines, was omitted from a published study. Is the pursuit of success and money at all costs a form of violence?

Proverbs 22:1 offers another angle on riches.

A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches, and favor is better than silver or gold.

I am troubled by the impact that the pursuit of riches has on our health care system. Children and families experience the consequences. Perhaps out of fear we submit our children to more and more vaccines. Yet chronic disease and immune system disorders are on the rise. It seems that the family is under attack by forces that are veiled.

And so I pray for children and the family.

Prayer: Lord Jesus, you love the children and have entrusted them to our care. I pray for truth in medical research. Give parents wisdom as they care for their family. May we understand our limitations and seek to support health with a deep respect for life. You have created us and we seek wisdom from you.

Linking with Words with WinterSunday StillnessWeekend WhispersFriendship Friday and Thought Provoking Thursday

Grace in Marriage

Gracious Woman

A gracious woman gets honor. Proverbs 11:16

This week I listened to a webinar on life coaching. This was the basic question being addressed: How do we help people make healthy changes in their lifestyle? The program was designed for health care workers, but it applies to family life as well. I took notes as I listened and identified practical tips for encouraging changes in behavior (mine and my husband’s).

It is easy for me to get frustrated with my husband’s way of doing home repair. We have different perspectives. It’s the engineer with great designs vs. the manager of home and hospitality.

The first thing I need to do is, to listen to him explain his plans. Then I can ask questions—helping both of us to see a project more clearly. The conversation should include two reflections for every question. A reflection restates what the other person has said and confirms understanding.

Making demands or instructing my husband on what needs to be done doesn’t work. Instead demands throw a wedge in our relationship and can shut down our communication. We can both be pretty self-centered. I want a project done yesterday. Hubby wants to work on his own time-line. The appearance is important to me and hubby is satisfied when it is functional. We need to listen to each other in turn and compromise.

I am not going to get everything I want, but we can stay us on a path of progress, working together. We can increase our understanding of each other’s strengths.

Dialogue works (supporting motivation) when positive comments are in a 3:1 ratio with negative comments, for relationships in general. In a marriage relationship the positive to negative comment ratio needs to be 5:1. I was startled when the lecturer said this. I need to improve!

How often do I notice the good things my husband is accomplishing? Do I let him know? Do I affirm his strengths?

The word I chose for 2015 is gracious. I have been paying attention to the way I interact with people that I meet.  And I can still grow in    graciousness toward my husband in our daily life.

The apostle Paul’s letters to the Christians at Ephesus and Colosse    addresses  husbands and wives. They struggled in their relationships too!

Wives, submit to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord.                     Husbands, love your wives, and do not be harsh with them.                      Colossians 3:18

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Potato Salad with Apple

L of L

The apples are ripening. So many good recipes include apples, but have you ever added apples to potato salad? A Finnish chef shared a recipe for potato salad with an apple at a conference I attended. Here is my version of the recipe:

6 medium size yukon gold potatoes

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon vinegar

1/3 cup mayonnaise

1 apple (I like pink lady for this recipe)

1 large dill pickle

2 Tablespoons of chopped chives

1 garlic clove, peeled and diced (optional)

1/3 cup whole milk yogurt

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

Steam the potatoes until tender. Immediately peel them—the skin will slip off with a little effort. (I use a fork to stabilize the potato and a knife to gently remove the skin.) Chop the hot potatoes coarsely. Mix the olive oil and vinegar and add it to the potatoes. Mix. Then add the mayonnaise. Mix. A southern chef taught me this process of working with the potatoes while they are still hot to preserve the creamy quality of the potatoes.

Then refrigerate the potatoes while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. Peel and chop the apple, dice the dill pickle and garlic clove. Add the apple, pickle, garlic and chives to the potatoes and mix.

Make sure the potatoes have cooled down before adding the yogurt. When it is cool add the yogurt, salt and pepper.

If you make the salad a day ahead the flavors have a chance to meld together.

Potato Salad with Apple

Potatoes have these nutrients: Vitamin C, Vitamin B-1, Niacin, Potassium and Iron.

The Michigan Potato Industry Commission has these tips for storing potatoes:

  • Handle gently. Bumps and bruises can lead to rot.
  • Store at a temperature between 40 to 50 degrees. Storing in the refrigerator may be too cool, causing the potato starch to turn to sugar. (I don’t really have room in my refrigerator for a bag of potatoes.)
  • Store in a dark, dry place. It is a little challenging to store potatoes in the summer! How do you store your potatoes?

Linking with The Art of Home-Making,  Motivation MondayFriendship Friday,  From the Farm and Real Food Friday

Pilgrim’s Inn: Book Review

When I picked up the book, Pilgrim’s Inn: The Herb of Grace, at a resale shop I didn’t realize that it is the second book in a series about the Eliot family. Elizabeth Goudge wrote a trilogy; the first book is The Bird in the Tree and the third book is The Heart of the Family. Pilgrims’s Inn was published in 1948 and is a good read by itself.

Pilgrim's Inn

Rue is the herb referred to in the title. The leaves on this herb have narrow green lobes, and in the summer it blossoms with small yellow flowers. According to the Complete Herb Book, “Rue was known as Herb of Grace, perhaps because it was regarded as a protector against the devil, witchcraft and magic. It was also used as an antidote against every kind of poison from toadstools to snakebites.”*

The story reveals that the Inn was once managed by a group of monks, offering hospitality to travelers. The Inn contains a secret, a wonderful room with hidden art.

The Eliot family in postwar England is burdened and weary. Through the manipulation of Lucilla , matriarch of the Eliots, her son’s family settles in the Inn.

I read a couple chapters each evening and began to appreciate the careful drawing of each character as they worked through trouble and frustration. The author has a keen perception of children and writes a forgiving description of their mischief.

Elizabeth Goudge has painted a picture of Pilgrim’s Inn, ascribing to it an attitude of hospitality and healing. She has written about the forest behind the Inn and its animals with fine description. A love of nature permeates her words.

Like the Inn, this book was a peaceful welcome for me. It took me to a place that I enjoyed. The closing chapter contains a message about children and the family.

There were still children in the world, and while there were children, men and women would not abandon the struggle to make safe homes to put them in, and while they so struggled there was hope.**

The book has a soothing quality, clearly conveying the value of family life.

cover-image

*Jekka McVicar, The Complete Herb Book, Kyle Cathie Limited: London, 1999 p. 166

** Elizabeth Goudge, Pilgrim’s Inn: Herb of Grace, Coward-McCann, Inc.: New York, 1948 p. 331

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Morning Devotions: Psalm 119

 

Rhythm of the Waves

God has given us rhythm in nature and in his Word.

This summer my husband and I have been reading from Psalm 119 for morning devotions. It is the longest chapter in the Bible with 176 verses. The verses have a poetic rhythm that is just partially revealed in the English translation. In Hebrew one letter of the alphabet marks each section. Verses one through eight each begin with aleph. Verses nine through sixteen begin with bet, and so on through the alphabet.

Psalm 119 is a tutorial on the word of God—arranged in a manner that encourages memorization.

Ron Hirschhorn, a member of our church, has written a devotional book, Psalm 119: The Supremacy of God’s Word. The devotions cover 22 days. Each day focuses on one eight-verse section. Hirschhorn reflects on the meaning and application for that section.

On day 17 the title of the devotion is “10 Reminders to Keep Pressing On”. Here are the verses for the day (129 -136).

Your testimonies are wonderful; therefore my soul keeps them.

The unfolding of your words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple.

I open my mouth and pant because I long for your commandments.

Turn to me and be gracious to me, as is your way with those who love your name.

Keep steady my steps according to your promise,

and let no iniquity get dominion over me.

Redeem me from man’s oppression, that I may keep your precepts,

Make your face shine upon your servant, and teach me your statutes,

My eyes shed streams of tears, because people do not keep your law.

The last first verse stirred my thoughts about the chaos in our country. Hirschhorn directs the reader to press on to have a merciful heart for people that ignore God’s laws. We must care.

We have enjoyed the devotional book. It was easy to do together in the morning, and it encouraged discussion.

Linking with After my CoffeeWords with WinterSunday StillnessMake My Saturday Sweet,  Weekend WhispersGrace & Truth and Booknificent Thursday


Amanda’s Books and More

Gardens of Hope

Phlox

During the past week I returned to Detroit. (The first 12 years of my life I lived in Detroit.) I was shocked to drive though a community with abandoned and burned out houses. And yet there is hope and a passion for life here.

I visited Brightmoor and I was treated to a walking tour of the community gardens. Amid abandoned homes the gardens are a vibrant sign of hope. As I talked with people that work on the gardens, I learned a little more. I tasted the salad herb, purslane, and ground cherries.

One family was putting in a rain garden in their front yard. The plants and flowers have deep roots that can absorb a lot of water from saturated soil, preventing overflow in the sewage system. The people of Brightmoor are enthusiastic about protecting and restoring the neighborhood. Perseverence. Passion. Hope.

I had much to think about on my way home. It was a nice break in driving to  stop at a farm market. I bought some blueberries, peaches and tomatoes. (Michigan is a great place to get blueberries!)

At home I have flowers, berry bushes, herbs and a few vegetables—and weeds. We have had a lot of rain this year which has been great for my plants and also for the weeds. When I go out to work on my garden patches I lose track of time. As I work I have time to sort out my thoughts. I have been thinking about gardens.

We have a deep place in our heart that receives refreshment from a garden. God has created us that way.

And the Lord God planted a garden in Eden, in the east, and there he put the man whom he had formed. And out of the ground the Lord God made to spring up every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food. Genesis 2: 8 -9a

Even if you don’t have a garden, you can still enjoy the refreshment of one. Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Take a walk at a botanical garden. It provides a great opportunity to learn about plants. When I visit a city on vacation I look for their botanical garden. Chicago, Phoenix AZ and Albuquerque NM have wonderful gardens.
  2. Spend a morning at a local farmer’s market, seeing all the produce. Sometimes they have flowers, too. Talk with the farmers. You never know what you might learn.
  3. Plan a garden for next year.

Pink PhloxLinking with Thought Provoking ThursdayA Little R & R,  Wildcrafting WednesdayWords with Winter, Roses of Inspiration,  Sunday Stillness,  Friendship Friday and Grace & Truth

 

The Uncomfortable Truth About Vaccine Research

 

vaccines

Gut wrenching videos. Do you wonder what kind of research requires live baby parts? The barbaric procedures we have seen in undercover videos did not happen overnight. Biological research has been taking place for years with ever increasing boldness. I was shocked when I came across a link to a Finnish research article that detailed experimentation with live fetuses during abortions.

In the past I have expressed pride in my Finnish heritage. But medical research culled from abortion? I am saddened. In 1950 Finland legalized abortion. Socialized medicine paid for the abortions; research provided a return on the investment.

A research paper titled, “Development of Mammalian Sulfur Metabolism”, was published in Pediatric Research in 1972.  It details an experiment performed on live fetuses, just prior to the termination of their life. The purpose of the study was to track the metabolism of amino acids—requiring that the fetus live for 10 minutes beyond the injection of a solution into the umbilical cord. This study was designed to assist in the production of infant formula.

The article states: We have therefore examined the development of the transsulfuration pathway in 58 human fetuses obtained at therapeutic abortion during approximately the 2nd-6th month of gestation and in liver from 5 full term and 3 prematurely born infants.

The article goes on to explain the procedure that was used on live fetuses lifted from the uterus during a surgical procedure (hysterotomy): For “in vivo” experiments, each fetus immediately after removal from the uterus was injected with . . . [a specific solution]. All injections were made into the umbilical vein through a short Teflon catheter which was then rinsed with 0.2 ml 0.9% NaCl; the whole cord was clamped on the fetal side of the point of entry of the catheter to prevent blood loss during the experiment. After 10 min, the cord was severed close to the fetus, and as much blood as possible was collected into a tube which contained heparin as anticoagulant. The fetal organs were quickly removed and dropped into liquid nitrogen. The plasma and organs were prepared for amino acid analysis as described previously [26]  Click here to access the article.

This was not the only research being conducted through abortions. I did a little more searching. Timo Vesikari writes about his participation in vaccine development in an article titled, “From Rubella to Rotavirus, and Beyond”.* Here is an excerpt from the abstract:

Next, in late 1966, I was incredibly lucky to meet Antti Vaheri (later Professor of Virology) who had just returned to Finland from the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia with all the latest knowledge in rubella research. . . . Live attenuated rubella vaccines were being developed and the leading candidate was HP-77 high passage virus from NIH. An important open question was whether the live attenuated vaccine would cross placenta same way as wild type rubella virus. The crucial study was to be done in Finland, away from potentially damaging publicity in the US, with Dr. Fred Robbins, a Nobel Laureate, as godfather of the project. Under the seniors I was to do much of the work: vaccinate pregnant women prescreened to be seronegative for rubella and scheduled to have a legal abortion a week or two later. The plan was to isolate rubella (vaccine) virus from the products of conception [the baby] and, in fact, we succeeded in doing that.

Vaccine research continues. According to a table that is available here, twenty-one vaccines indicate a line of fetal cells in their preparation. The terms that identify a line of fetal cells, from individual fetuses are: WI-38, MRC-5, HEK-293, PER C6, Procell92, RA273. I believe that it takes experiments from many abortions to achieve one line of live cells.

I am not against scientific research that provides medical treatment, but we need to have boundaries on what is ethical. We shouldn’t being killing children of the next generation to provide vaccines that may or may not prevent an infectious disease.

I hope you will join with me in praying for our members of congress. We must demand that they look at research practices, defund planned parenthood and review the manner in which vaccines are produced along with the risks and benefits. Pray for the women that have been traumatized by abortion. Pray for the children.

For more about the MMR vaccine (which contains rubella derived from fetal cells), click here.

UPDATE: A scientist speaks up against the use of fetal tissue in research.             Click here.

UPDATE: A new line of fetal cells for the purpose of making vaccines, has been developed from more abortions.  Click here.

Psalm 139

 

*Vesikari, Timo, M.D., PhD., “From Rubella to Rotavirus and Beyond”, Human Vaccines & Immunotherapies, vol. 11, issue 6, 2015 pp. 1302-1305.

Linking with Titus 2sday,  Grace & Truth,  A Little R and R and Tuesdays with a Twist

Calendula: A Healing Flower

Art Shades Calendula

In recent years I have been charmed by the benefits of a flower that has a long history. According to the Complete Herbal Book: This sunny little flower—the “merrybuds” of Shakespeare—was first used in Indian and Arabic cultures, before being “discovered” by the ancient Egyptians and Greeks.*

The medicinal qualities of calendula are listed: Calendula flowers contain antiseptic, antifungal and antibacterial properties that promote healing.*

This year I bought some heirloom seeds from Select Seeds—Art Shades Calendula and Orange King Calendula. Both are growing in my garden.

Calendula Flower
Art Shades Calendula
Calendula Flower
Orange King Calendula

Calendula is an edible flower, and the dried the petals of this flower have been called poor man’s saffron. I dry my calendula flowers by placing them on cheesecloth or a paper towel over a drying rack.

Drying Calendula Flowers

It takes approximately 2 weeks for the flowers to dry in room air. Then I place them in an airtight canning jar for use throughout the year.

Calendula flowers make a healthy tea. Tips for a variety of ways to benefit from calendula tea are posted at thenerdyfarmwife.com. Be sure to note the caution mentioned for use during pregnancy.  Calendula salve is another way to make use of the flowers. It is fairly easy to make. You can find my process here.

Every couple days I pick the blossoms, but when I am not fast enough they go to seed. The seeds can be saved for next year’s flowers.

Calendula Seed

The curved seeds with a bumpy surface are released from the dried flower head.It is possible for the plant to self-seed for the following year, but that hasn’t worked well in my garden. I plant the seeds outside in the early spring.

If you don’t have calendula in your garden but would like to add it to your stock of helpful herbs, you can order a package of dried calendula from The Bulk Herb Store.

Great selection of bulk herbs, books, and remedies. Articles, Research Aids and much more.

*McVicar, Jessica, The Complete Herb Book, Kyle Cathie Limited: London, 1994.   p. 56-57.

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Canning Elderberry Juice

Harvested Elderberries
Harvested Elderberries

A number of recipes for elderberry syrup are posted on the internet. I have collected ideas for making the best use of my elderberries. I want to preserve the health benefits for this fall and winter.

I have a good harvest of berries this year. Instead of making a syrup to keep in the refrigerator, I am going to can elderberry juice. Then during flu season, I can bring out the preserved juice and add some raw honey.  Raw honey has helpful enzymes, but the health benefit diminishes if it is heated.

Don’t have a source for elderberries? Dried elderberries are available from the Bulk Herb Store. Click here.

The recipe for elderberry juice: place 1 cup of water for each cup of berries in a stainless steel pot. (If you are using dried berries you will need 2 cups of water for each cup of berries.) Bring to a boil and then simmer over low heat, covered, for about 30 minutes, stirring frequently. Crush the berries with a potato masher and add ¼ teaspoon ceylon cinnamon for each cup of berries, a slice of organic ginger root and a couple slices of an organic lemon.

Elderberries_4774

Simmer for 20 minutes more without a cover. Strain the berries in a strainer that has been lined with a double layer of cheesecloth.

Elderberries_4776

Allow it to drain, pressing on the berries periodically with a wooden spoon. Add ¼ cup honey to each cup of strained juice and mix thoroughly. Heat the juice to a simmer over medium heat before pouring into sterilized jars.

According to instructions for berry juice in Stocking Up* the juice can be canned in a hot water bath. Place the prepared lids on the jars. Tighten the lids and then give a quarter turn back. Place in the prepared boiling water–making sure that the jars are submerged, water above the lids.  Instructions for pint or quart jars give a 30 minute processing time. I plan to use 8 ounce jars. For 8 oz. jars the time might be a little less, but to be safe I will process for 30 minutes. (If you make a small amount of juice there is no need to can it. Allow the juice to cool. Add 1/2 cup of raw honey to a cup of juice and refrigerate. It will keep for a couple months.)

Elderberries_4777

When the jar of juice is opened for use it can be poured into a larger jar and raw honey added. And then it should be kept in the refrigerator. A child can be given a teaspoon at a time. An adult can take a tablespoon at a time. The dose can be repeated every couple hours when fighting a cold or the flu.

An alternative way to use the juice–place a teaspoon (or a tablespoon) of juice in  water or cooled tea. Add a teaspoon of raw honey.

NOTE: This remedy is not for children under one year of age; they should not be given honey.

Stocking Up edited by Carol H. Stoner, Rodale Press: Emmaus, PA 1977.

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